Wednesday Woo: Editing

Looking to start the editing process? I am too. I’ve started with Shawn Coyne’s site The Story Grid and am still working my way through it.

I’ve linked to this before but haven’t elaborated on its content. And because I think your time is precious and you should be writing or reading what is most relevant to you I’m only going to briefly say this…I find this site to be the clearest and most effective resource for clarifying your plot, getting down to the very basics of what your story is, and needs to be. Go.

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Wednesday Woo: Continuing Education

Oops. Been a bit crazy here and I forgot to finish Wednesday’s post this week. Up next week will be plotting.  Belatedly–here’s a lazy ass way to give you a bunch of links at once.

If you are a blogger Jon Morrow’s site is essential reading. Boost Blog Traffic

This post is about educating yourself continuously on the craft of writing, 9 Essential Books for Writers.

 

 

Dorothy Cora Moore today, author of Writing Made Easy: How to Develop a Tight Plot & Memorable Characters. Dorothy is both a novelist and screenwriter, – See more at: http://writershelpingwriters.net/2014/05/michael-crichtons-method-plotting-story/#sthash.HH9Y5X87.dpuf
Dorothy Cora Moore today, author of Writing Made Easy: How to Develop a Tight Plot & Memorable Characters. Dorothy is both a novelist and screenwriter, – See more at: http://writershelpingwriters.net/2014/05/michael-crichtons-method-plotting-story/#sthash.HH9Y5X87.dpuf
Dorothy Cora Moore today, author of Writing Made Easy: How to Develop a Tight Plot & Memorable Characters. Dorothy is both a novelist and screenwriter, – See more at: http://writershelpingwriters.net/2014/05/michael-crichtons-method-plotting-story/#sthash.HH9Y5X87.dpuf

Dorothy Cora Moore today, author of Writing Made Easy: How to Develop a Tight Plot & Memorable Characters. Dorothy is both a novelist and screenwriter, – See more at: http://writershelpingwriters.net/2014/05/michael-crichtons-method-plotting-story/#sthash.HH9Y5X87.dpuf
Dorothy Cora Moore today, author of Writing Made Easy: How to Develop a Tight Plot & Memorable Characters. Dorothy is both a novelist and screenwriter, – See more at: http://writershelpingwriters.net/2014/05/michael-crichtons-method-plotting-story/#sthash.HH9Y5X87.dpuf

Wednesday Woo: Beta Readers

Mom has read your book, heaped praise upon your head for its cleverness, and depth of human emotion, then proceeded to tell everyone she knows that it is the best thing she’s ever read. Congrats.

But unless your mother is an editor at Doubleday, your book still needs some help. Help in the form of beta readers, especially those willing to risk bruising your ego to assist you in putting out a quality product.

What constitutes a quality product is subjective, even the most poorly written work’s premise can still be a good story. This is a compilation of views on what a bad book is or isn’t–The Top 40 Bad Books.

Let’s assume you’re looking to produce something to be proud of. You’ve done all you can by ensuring it is your very best work to date, and have put in the grueling hours of revisions and edits. It is now time to let someone else give you their two cents.

I’m serious about you needing to care about the product you’re sending out into the world. It represents you. It says something about who you are as writer and a person. As a reader, I have no respect for writers who ask me to shell out my hard earned money for something they didn’t deem worthy enough to seek help with.

Sure, there are a few writers able to edit their own work, just as there are beta readers whose skills are on par with a professional content editor, but they are few and far between.

Stop resisting doing the right thing for expediency. Get your beta readers lined up and let them fire away. How to Find A Beta Reader

Beta Reader Guidelines

Self-publishing is far too easy. It means anyone can do it regardless of quality, regardless of the consumer, regardless of how this reflects on other self-published authors. Vanity publishing serves only ego, not the craft of writing, or the business of being an author.

Here’s a test. Would you be embarrassed to send your book to a traditional publisher, or a literary agent? Then stop right there. Save up every penny you can, put off publishing for a year, even two, get yourself a professional content editor and polish that work till it shines. Only then, when it is worthy of it’s price tag, release it into the world amid as much fanfare as you can muster knowing you’ve done the best job you possible could, for yourself, your fellow authors, your readers and the self-publishing industry as a whole.

15 Ways to Find a Beta Reader

How to Tackle Those Critique Notes

Beta Readers on deviant Art

6 Tips for Picking Your Beta Readers

Wednesday Woo: The End?

You’ve reached the end of your story, congratulation. Now what? A first draft is great but no way close to being ready for print.

It is time for editing, revising and deep thinking and you’re wonder how to start?

The first recommendation is usually is to put it away, and not look at it for while. You’ll get a better perspective of it and come back to it with fresh eyes. Here’s a few question to ask before you put your work to bed.

11 Questions to Ask Yourself When You Reach the End

Then when you are ready to begin the revision process, here are a few different approaches and tips for revising:

http://jenniferblanchard.net/revision-road-map/

http://warriorwriters.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/six-easy-tips-for-self-editing-your-fiction/

http://hollylisle.com/one-pass-manuscript-revision-from-first-draft-to-last-in-one-cycle/

http://www.helpingwritersbecomeauthors.com/2013/06/how-i-self-edit-my-novels-15-steps-from.html

http://www.cherylklein.com/id21.html

 

Is it Worth Revising?

Wednesday Woo: The Importance of Professionals

If you intend to self-publish you’ve inevitably come to the question of whether or not you need to hire professional editors, book cover designers or marketers.

The answer is YES, on all counts. The importance of professionals can not be underestimated. I will concede that there are very particular circumstances in which forgoing the pros can be acceptable. For instance, if this a vanity publication and you are doing it just for the satisfaction of seeing your name in print. You can probably skip spending the money on the pros.

Do you expect to, or need to make a profit from publishing this book? Or will you be happy to have your friends and family buy your work?

Do you aspire to have your book in retail outlets and wish to reach a wide audience?

Discriminating book buyers will not find your work acceptable if it hasn’t been polished.

To put the best product out there you’ll need an editor.

Here are a few why’s, how-tos and how not to of hiring an editor.

http://writerunboxed.com/2010/03/19/should-you-hire-a-professional-editor/

http://www.copyblogger.com/professional-self-publishing/

http://writersinthestorm.wordpress.com/2013/08/30/hiring-a-professional-editor-shrewd-or-shameful/

http://thefutureofink.com/self-published-books-dont-sell/

http://www.the-efa.org/res/rates.php

http://katiemccoach.com/2013/11/developmental-editing-what-is-it-exactly/